Blog

Where are the Arts on the Food Chain of Education?  Who do we Invite to Dinner?

Reflections by Joanne Seelig Lamparter, Director of Education and Theatre for Change, Imagination Stage Though the MasonARC convening was several weeks ago, the conversations still loom in my mind.  It is no coincidence that in Maryland, we are nearing the time that the Kirwan Commission Bill will be voted on by Maryland State legislation.  In Read more about Where are the Arts on the Food Chain of Education?  Who do we Invite to Dinner?[…]

Do the arts make kids smart, or do already smart kids choose the arts? (1/3)

Part 1 – Understanding “Selection Effects” from MasonARC’s 3 Part Series: The Fundamental Questions of Arts Education and Causal Outcomes. This post is by: Alenamie Alegrado and Dr. Adam Winsler   Many people believe that the visual and performing arts (music, drama, dance, visual art) make kids smarter and cause them to perform better in Read more about Do the arts make kids smart, or do already smart kids choose the arts? (1/3)[…]

The Rise of Arts Research- Thalia Goldstein’s Reflections from MasonARC19

This post is by Thalia R. Goldstein, and cross posted on her PsychologyToday.com blog.  The MasonARC convening on October 18, 2019 was a fantastic opportunity to see in practice a growing trend I’ve noticed over the course of the last 10 years.  When I first entered graduate school and decided that the topic I wanted to study Read more about The Rise of Arts Research- Thalia Goldstein’s Reflections from MasonARC19[…]

Student Reflections on the 1st Mason Arts Research Center Conference

Author note: This blog is cross posted Thalia Goldstein’s Psychology Today blog.  — We’re pleased the present the first of many blogs that will come from the October 18, 2019 highly successful first Mason Arts Research Center conference. The focus of this conference was looking at connections between research, practice and policy, with an emphasis on Read more about Student Reflections on the 1st Mason Arts Research Center Conference[…]

Artistic License and Scientific Truth

This Blog post is by Thalia R. Goldstein and cross posted on her PsychologyToday.com blog.  Science is concerned with finding the truth about the world. The best outcome in a scientific study is that it produces verifiable, replicable facts about the biological, chemical, physical, or psychological world. The same is not true in the theatre. Read more about Artistic License and Scientific Truth[…]

Improvisational Theatre May Help Improve Self Concept

by Thalia R. Goldstein and Brooke DeBettignies Improvisation (“Improv”) theatre has been made famous by Saturday Night Live, books by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, Whose Line is it Anyway, and many others. Improv is often pointed to as a way for groups of people to bond, to increase confidence, and to have some fun. But Read more about Improvisational Theatre May Help Improve Self Concept[…]

Developing Wonder: Theatre for Babies?

Reposted from Psychology Today, April 29, 2019. You have probably heard of theater for young audiences, but did you know there is a theater for babies? In fact, some of the most experimental and boundary-pushing contemporary live performance around the world is being made for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers. Artists who make work for this Read more about Developing Wonder: Theatre for Babies?[…]

Contexts for the Arts in Child Development

Welcome to the Mason Arts Research Center Blog!  We’re excited to present a series of blog posts on arts and child development, taking a variety of perspectives on both what we mean by “Arts” and what aspects of child development (such as education, cognitive development, and social development) we will be focusing on. However, before Read more about Contexts for the Arts in Child Development[…]